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NOMINATE NOW CHANGE_
MAKERS
THIS IS FOR THE #CHANGE_MAKERS CHANGE
MAKERS
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NOMINATE NOW FAMILY
SUPPORTERS
THIS IS FOR THE #CHANGE_MAKERS NOMINATE NOW
NOMINATE NOW PERCEPTION
SHIFTERS
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NOMINATE NOW STEREOTYPE
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IT’S OUR FAVOURITE TIME OF YEAR AT THE DIANA AWARD – NOMINATION SEASON.

This means that every day, we get to hear all about more incredible young people and the game-changing work they’re doing to transform people’s lives.

But we’ve been thinking – what if we miss someone? What if there are changemakers out there whose stories aren’t being told?

This is where you come in…

This year we’re bringing back our ‘This is for the #Change_Makers’ campaign.

Through their amazing work, our Change_Makers are inspiring other young people and breaking down the negative stereotypes young people are all too often labelled with. From tackling issues around mental health, education and gender equality, to supporting migrant workers, veterans, and refugees, these young people are stepping up today to change the world for tomorrow.

Sound like someone you know? Then you’re in the right place. Celebrate your young hero by nominating them for the 2020 Diana Award.

This is for the Change_Makers.

SUPPORT US ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Help us spread the word about our #Change_Maker campaign by downloading and sharing our posters on social media. Together we can celebrate more selfless young people.

MEET THE #CHANGE_MAKERS

Maya Ghazal Age 19, Birmingham, UK

For Maya Ghazal, her life changed in 2015 when she left Syria to begin a new life in the UK. When she arrived, she experienced first hand the difficulties that many young refugees and migrants face when they get to the UK. She couldn’t speak English and was lonely, homesick and struggled to get into education.

But since overcoming those first obstacles, Maya has more than found her feet. Finding a space at a local school, she learnt to speak fluent English and thrived in her studies; she has recently started at Brunel University to study Aviation Engineering with Pilot Studies. But throughout her journey she has always stayed true to her roots and is now using her voice along with The Children’s Society to speak out passionately for the many refugees who do not have one.

She says: “A refugee is like any other human being. The one difference between us and most other people is a big one: we lost our homes and have been forced to seek safety in another country”.

READ THE BLOG
Age 19, Birmingham, UK Maya Ghazal READ THE BLOG

For Maya Ghazal, her life changed in 2015 when she left Syria to begin a new life in the UK. When she arrived, she experienced first hand the difficulties that many young refugees and migrants face when they get to the UK. She couldn’t speak English and was lonely, homesick and struggled to get into education.

But since overcoming those first obstacles, Maya has more than found her feet. Finding a space at a local school, she learnt to speak fluent English and thrived in her studies; she has recently started at Brunel University to study Aviation Engineering with Pilot Studies. But throughout her journey she has always stayed true to her roots and is now using her voice along with The Children’s Society to speak out passionately for the many refugees who do not have one.

She says: “A refugee is like any other human being. The one difference between us and most other people is a big one: we lost our homes and have been forced to seek safety in another country”.

Junior Frood Age 14, Leeds, Yorkshire, UK

After being bullied at school for his love for dancing, Junior rose up against adversity and used his talents and passion to change people’s perceptions.

Starting a social media campaign #boyscandance and #boysdancetoo, Junior created a platform of empowerment for young men to break down stereotypes and embrace their passions whatever they may be.

Junior’s love for dancing has set him on the path to stardom and he has already danced with the likes of Little Mix and Justin Bieber. As well as being awarded the Diana Award, Junior has received a British Citizen Youth Award from the House of Lords, Point of Light Award from the Prime Minister and won the BBC Radio 1 Teen Hero Award, where he got the Royal stamp of approval from the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge for his fundraising work.

READ THE BLOG
Age 14, Leeds, Yorkshire, UK Junior Frood READ THE BLOG

After being bullied at school for his love for dancing, Junior rose up against adversity and used his talents and passion to change people’s perceptions.

Starting a social media campaign #boyscandance and #boysdancetoo, Junior created a platform of empowerment for young men to break down stereotypes and embrace their passions whatever they may be.

Junior’s love for dancing has set him on the path to stardom and he has already danced with the likes of Little Mix and Justin Bieber. As well as being awarded the Diana Award, Junior has received a British Citizen Youth Award from the House of Lords, Point of Light Award from the Prime Minister and won the BBC Radio 1 Teen Hero Award, where he got the Royal stamp of approval from the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge for his fundraising work.

Cody Mcmanus Age 10, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

Every child should receive a gift at Christmas. So when nine-year-old Cody realised that some of his friends and classmates would be getting nothing or little at Christmas time, he felt compelled to do something to change this.

Cody launched his own fundraising campaign ‘Cody’s Christmas Toy Box’, a sponsored challenge to box eight other young people in order to raise enough toy donations to fill an entire boxing ring. Through his efforts, he raised a staggering £12,000 worth of toys which he gave to over 500 children, helping to spread smiles and joy on Christmas Day.

Since his first campaign, Cody has gone on to gift over 1,000 children with toys and bikes. He says ‘I know there are more children who are waking up to nothing all over the world. I know I can’t help them all so in the future I’d like for everyone to go out and find a family that lives near them that needs a wee help not just at Christmas but through the year.’

READ THE BLOG
Age 16 Barnet, London, UK Cody Mcmanus READ THE BLOG

Every child should receive a gift at Christmas. So when nine-year-old Cody realised that some of his friends and classmates would be getting nothing or little at Christmas time, he felt compelled to do something to change this.

Cody launched his own fundraising campaign ‘Cody’s Christmas Toy Box’, a sponsored challenge to box eight other young people in order to raise enough toy donations to fill an entire boxing ring. Through his efforts, he raised a staggering £12,000 worth of toys which he gave to over 500 children, helping to spread smiles and joy on Christmas Day.

Since his first campaign, Cody has gone on to gift over 1000 children with toys and bikes. He says ‘I know there are more children who are waking up to nothing all over the world. I know I can’t help them all so in the future I’d like for everyone to go out and find a family that lives near them that needs a wee help not just at Christmas but through the year.’

Faith Dickinson Age 16, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada

When Faith was nine years old, her Aunt Lyndi was facing her fight with breast cancer. Living 3,000 miles apart, Faith wanted to support her Aunt through but was unsure how. Unable to comfort her with a hug, Faith decided to send her comfort in another way by making her a fleece-tie blanket.

Soon after Faith launched ‘Cuddles for Cancer’, a non-profit organisation which provides blankets to people suffering from cancer and other illnesses. She personalises every blanket for those who receive them and to date has made over 4,000 blankets which have been sent all over the globe from, from Canada, the United States, the UK, Germany, Brazil, Australia, France and countries in Africa.

As Faith’s project grew over time, she also started to make blankets for soldiers who have returned from war with injuries or living with PTSD, and she has fundraised over $30,000 to ensure that the blankets remain free to those who need them the most.

READ THE BLOG
Age 16, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada Faith Dickinson READ THE BLOG

When Faith was nine years old, her Aunt Lyndi was facing her fight with breast cancer. Living 3,000 miles apart, Faith wanted to support her Aunt through but was unsure how. Unable to comfort her with a hug, Faith decided to send her comfort in another way by making her a fleece-tie blanket.

Soon after Faith launched ‘Cuddles for Cancer’, a non-profit organisation which provides blankets to people suffering from cancer and other illnesses. She personalises every blanket for those who receive them and to date has made over 4,000 blankets which have been sent all over the globe from, from Canada, the United States, the UK, Germany, Brazil, Australia, France and countries in Africa.

As Faith’s project grew over time, she also started to make blankets for soldiers who have returned from war with injuries or living with PTSD, and she has fundraised over $30,000 to ensure that the blankets remain free to those who need them the most.

Jonathan Bryan Age 13, Chippenham, Wiltshire, UK

When Jonathan was born with cerebral palsy and renal failure, his parents were told by doctors that an MRI scan of his brain was one of the worst they had ever seen. His disability meant that he would live a life of limited mobility, bound to a wheel chair and unable to speak.

With his mother’s passionate support Jonathan learnt at nine years old to communicate via a Perspex spelling board. With a communication partner who reads his gaze to each letter, Jonathan can construct sentences, paragraphs and entire pieces of writing, eventually leading him to write a memoir ‘Eye Can Talk’, with a forward by Sir Michael Morpurgo. After years of silence, Jonathan found his voice and has since been impassioned to speak out on issues that are very close to his heart.

Now, at the age of 13, Jonathan is a tireless campaigner. He strongly believes that every child should have the opportunity to learn literacy, regardless of their condition, and has worked tirelessly to change the way students with complex disabilities are educated.

READ THE BLOG
Age 13, Chippenham, Wiltshire, UK Jonathan Bryan READ THE BLOG

When Jonathan was born with cerebral palsy and renal failure, his parents were told by doctors that an MRI scan of his brain was one of the worst they had ever seen. His disability meant that he would live a life of limited mobility, bound to a wheel chair and unable to speak.

With his mother’s passionate support Jonathan learnt at nine years old to communicate via a Perspex spelling board. With a communication partner who reads his gaze to each letter, Jonathan can construct sentences, paragraphs and entire pieces of writing, eventually leading him to write a memoir ‘Eye Can Talk’, with a forward by Sir Michael Morpurgo. After years of silence, Jonathan found his voice and has since been impassioned to speak out on issues that are very close to his heart.

Now, at the age of 13, Jonathan is a tireless campaigner. He strongly believes that every child should have the opportunity to learn literacy, regardless of their condition, and has worked tirelessly to change the way students with complex disabilities are educated.

Angel Hemmings Age 16 Barnet, London, UK

Angel is dedicated to improving mental health awareness and has worked passionately in her school to tackle the stigma associated with it after her school’s Head teacher sadly took his own life.

Angel and her fellow students started a school wide mental health campaign called ‘SOS Stamp out Stigma’. Through the campaign they made an app called ‘Speak Out’, in the hope of educating people about common mental health disorders; as well as signposting local mental health services and “safe” websites that young people could access for help.

“It was clear that many young people, although very vulnerable to experiencing mental health issues at some point in their lives themselves, were unaware of what exactly mental health was and had many misconceptions about the topic.”

READ THE BLOG
Age 16 Barnet, London, UK Angel Hemmings READ THE BLOG

Angel is dedicated to improving mental health awareness and has worked passionately in her school to tackle the stigma associated with it after her school’s Head teacher sadly took his own life.

Angel and her fellow students started a school wide mental health campaign called ‘SOS Stamp out Stigma’. Through the campaign they made an app called ‘Speak Out’, in the hope of educating people about common mental health disorders; as well as signposting local mental health services and “safe” websites that young people could access for help.

“It was clear that many young people, although very vulnerable to experiencing mental health issues at some point in their lives themselves, were unaware of what exactly mental health was and had many misconceptions about the topic.”

Cory Nieves Age 14, Englewood, New Jersey, USA

At just six years old, Cory combined his passion to help people with his love of treats to set up Mr. Cory’s Cookies, a successful business selling natural gourmet cookies. Harnessing his natural entrepreneurial spirit for good, he subsequently founded Mr. Cory Cares, a foundation which supports other charities, so that his business can make a positive impact elsewhere.

Cory’s success as an entrepreneur has encouraged him to speak publicly on issues that he is passionate about, using his voice to encourage other young people to follow in his footsteps and become entrepreneurs capable of creating positive change in their community. Despite his humble beginnings - being born to a single teenage mother while she was in foster care - he is driven, focused, and passionate to give back to his community.

‘I want other young people to make a change in this world. I want other kids to stand up and fight for what they believe in.’

READ THE BLOG
Age 14, Englewood, New Jersey, USA Cory Nieves READ THE BLOG

At just six years old, Cory combined his passion to help people with his love of treats to set up Mr. Cory’s Cookies, a successful business selling natural gourmet cookies. Harnessing his natural entrepreneurial spirit for good, he subsequently founded Mr. Cory Cares, a foundation which supports other charities, so that his business can make a positive impact elsewhere.

Cory’s success as an entrepreneur has encouraged him to speak publicly on issues that he is passionate about, using his voice to encourage other young people to follow in his footsteps and become entrepreneurs capable of creating positive change in their community. Despite his humble beginnings - being born to a single teenage mother while she was in foster care - he is driven, focused, and passionate to give back to his community.

‘I want other young people to make a change in this world. I want other kids to stand up and fight for what they believe in.’

Daniella Timperley Age 18, Ballymena, Northern Ireland

In Northern Ireland last year, there were over 31,000 incidents of domestic abuse, the highest yearly number since 2005. This is why 18-year old Daniella is determined to do something about this.

Daniella has been passionate about tackling domestic violence in a positive and proactive way as it is a cause close to her heart. Since 2016 she has represented Woman’s Aid ABCLN on the BBC Children in Need Youth Panel where she voices the needs of people affected by domestic abuse and highlights the crucial work that Women’s Aid does. She has raised awareness about domestic violence and emotional control through films which have been shown in school assemblies, helping to educate young people on the impact of domestic abuse and how to spot it.

“The effects of domestic abuse are not always recognisable, you never know what goes on behind the closed doors of your friend or family member’s house. It is important that young people know the signs of an abusive partner so that they do not end up in those kinds of relationships in the future.”

READ THE BLOG
Age 18, Ballymena, Northern Ireland Daniella Timperle READ THE BLOG

In Northern Ireland last year, there were over 31,000 incidents of domestic abuse, the highest yearly number since 2005. This is why 18-year old Daniella is determined to do something about this.

Daniella has been passionate about tackling domestic violence in a positive and proactive way as it is a cause close to her heart. Since 2016 she has represented Woman’s Aid ABCLN on the BBC Children in Need Youth Panel where she voices the needs of people affected by domestic abuse and highlights the crucial work that Women’s Aid does. She has raised awareness about domestic violence and emotional control through films which have been shown in school assemblies, helping to educate young people on the impact of domestic abuse and how to spot it.

“The effects of domestic abuse are not always recognisable, you never know what goes on behind the closed doors of your friend or family member’s house. It is important that young people know the signs of an abusive partner so that they do not end up in those kinds of relationships in the future.”

ALEX ANDERSON 2017 AWARD HOLDER, AGE 18, NEWPORT, WALES, UK

Despite facing personal challenges from having Asperger’s Syndrome, Alex has given up over 1,000 hours of his spare time to make a difference volunteering, campaigning and fundraising for organizations like Ty Hafan, Saint David’s the Alzheimer’s Society and Air Cadets. He decided to turn his diagnosis into a strength and become an ambassador for people with special needs.

Alex said, “I have seen how the system can fail people, so I want to campaign to change people’s minds, so all people can get the support they need.” Alex is now a passionate public speaker, speaking out to raise awareness about autism so that others like him can know their potential.

READ THE BLOG
AGE 18, NEWPORT, WALES, UK ALEX ANDERSON READ THE BLOG

Despite facing personal challenges from having Asperger’s Syndrome, Alex has given up over 1,000 hours of his spare time to make a difference volunteering, campaigning and fundraising for organizations like Ty Hafan, Saint David’s the Alzheimer’s Society and Air Cadets. He decided to turn his diagnosis into a strength and become an ambassador for people with special needs.

Alex said, “I have seen how the system can fail people, so I want to campaign to change people’s minds, so all people can get the support they need.” Alex is now a passionate public speaker, speaking out to raise awareness about autism so that others like him can know their potential.

Nikhiya Shamsher Age 16, Bangalore India

In some areas in India there is a huge wealth divide between schools. Compelled to change this, Nikhiya started Bags, Books and Blessings, an initative that distributes reusable school supplies to schools in need. In the last 4 years, Bags, Books and Blessings has provided school supplies to 11,525 underprivileged students.

Nikhiya believes that the best way to predict the future is to create it. With a global population of 7 billion she sees education as a huge opportunity to create a better world. She is doing her bit to improve access to education, taking steps to ensure that that every child in India gets equal opportunities to excel in life.

‘Change makers are the change agents for society who can seize opportunities, invent new approaches and create solutions to change society for the better.’

READ THE BLOG
Age 16, Bangalore India Nikhiya Shamsher READ THE BLOG

In some areas in India there is a huge wealth divide between schools. Compelled to change this, Nikhiya started Bags, Books and Blessings, an initative that distributes reusable school supplies to schools in need. In the last 4 years, Bags, Books and Blessings has provided school supplies to 11525 underprivileged students.

Nikhiya believes that the best way to predict the future is to create it. With a global population of 7 billion she sees education as a huge opportunity to create a better world. She is doing her bit to improve access to education, taking steps to ensure that that every child in India gets equal opportunities to excel in life.

‘Change makers are the change agents for society who can seize opportunities, invent new approaches and create solutions to change society for the better.’

Amaan Iqbal Ibrahim Age 17, 
Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

In the United Arab Emirates there are over 8,000,000 labourers working in the construction industry, hailing from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Philippines and Bangladesh, very few can afford to be joined by their families.

On learning about the labourers working life in UAE, Amaan mobilised hundreds of students and organisations to come together and organise regular visits to the labourers and for food to be served during regional and religious festivals so that they could have a cause for celebration amid their working lives. Over three years he has volunteered on camp visits and served more than 8,200 labourers.

READ THE BLOG
Ibrahim, Age 17
Sharjah, United Arab Emirates Amaan Iqbal READ THE BLOG

In the United Arab Emirates there are over 8,000,000 labourers working in the construction industry, hailing from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Philippines and Bangladesh, very few can afford to be joined by their families.

On learning about the labourers working life in UAE, Amaan mobilised hundreds of students and organisations to come together and organise regular visits to the labourers and for food to be served during regional and religious festivals so that they could have a cause for celebration amid their working lives. Over three years he has volunteered on camp visits and served more than 8200 labourers.

Bella Field Age 13 Woodford Green, Greater London, UK

“It’s cancer” – two words that no one ever wants to hear. For 5-year-old Bella, it was her older sister Molly who received the diagnosis. When Molly died at home from an inoperable brain tumour in September 2010 - six months after being diagnosed - it marked the start of a difficult but life-changing journey for her sister Bella.

In the months after Molly’s death, Bella and her family received support from Haven House Children’s Hospices bereavement services.

Now 13 years old, Bella has raised an astounding £100,000 for Haven House, through a host of community events. Through Bella’s work, Haven House can now support many more life-limited children and have grown their planned respite service, end-of-life care, as well as their emotional and physical wellbeing services.

BLOG COMING SOON
Age 13 Woodford Green, Greater London, UK Bella Field BLOG COMING SOON

“It’s cancer” – two words that no one ever wants to hear. For 5-year-old Bella, it was her older sister Molly who received the diagnosis. When Molly died at home from an inoperable brain tumour in September 2010 - six months after being diagnosed - it marked the start of a difficult but life-changing journey for her sister Bella.

In the months after Molly’s death, Bella and her family received support from Haven House Children’s Hospices bereavement services.

Now 13 years old, Bella has raised an astounding £100,000 for Haven House, through a host of community events. Through Bella’s work, Haven House can now support many more life-limited children and have grown their planned respite service, end-of-life care, as well as their emotional and physical wellbeing services.

THIS CAMPAIGN WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY

A special thank you to JKR, British Airways and Gilead for making this campaign possible.

AN OUTSTANDING YOUNG PERSON FOR A 2020 DIANA AWARD

© 2020 The Diana Award. The Diana Award is a registered charity (1117288 / SC041916) and a company limited by guarantee, registered in England and Wales number 5739137.